Our work


Acutely Sick Kid Parent Information Project (ASK PIP)

Jan 2012 - Jan 2013
Funded by an NIHR Programme Grant held by Professor Matthew Thompson at the University of Oxford

Professor Matthew Thompson (Chief Investigator)
Dr Sarah Neill (Principal Investigator)
Dr Caroline Jones (Qualitative Data Analyst)
Mrs Hayley Singlehurst-Mooney (Research Assistant)
Professor Monica Lakhanpaul (Collaborator)
Lindsey Robinson (Parent Panel Representative)

Parents’ and healthcare professionals’ use of information resources during decision making in acute childhood illness at home.

This project used a qualitative design, using the key elements of grounded theory, to determine parents and health care professionals use of information, what they liked, disliked and what they wanted to see in the future. Methods included focus groups and interviews with 27 parents from a range of socioeconomic groups and 16 first contact healthcare professionals in the East Midlands of the UK.

Methods

This project used a qualitative design, using the key elements of grounded theory, to determine parent’s and health care professional’s use of information, what they liked, disliked and what they wanted to see in the future. We used focus groups and interviews with 27 parents from a range of socioeconomic groups and 16 first contact healthcare professionals in the East Midlands of the UK.

Findings

Parents’ safety netting behaviour

Parents’ pre-consultation information seeking was dominated by the internet, albeit with limited success. Some parents always sought information through personal contact whilst others did so when independent information seeking failed. When talking about the information they had received during consultations, although they did not always receive information, parents reported that they liked to be given information to refer to later, although the information received varied. Parents expressed a preference for safety netting information that was easy to access, professionally validated, using simple messages with access to more detailed information. Importantly, neither hard copy nor the internet was accessible for parents with low levels of literacy.

Health care professionals’ safety netting behaviour

Health care professionals defined safety netting as including advising parents about what to look for, when and where to seek help. Yet they also reported that its delivery was inconsistent, whether verbal or written. Safety netting was reported to be influenced by the clinician’s experience, confidence, time and knowledge, their perceptions of the parent’s anxiety, experience and competence. They also reported limitations to safety netting such as not knowing if the information had been understood or effective. No clinicians reported having received training in safety netting.

Project Outputs

Conference presentations

Jones, C.H.D., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D., Singlehurst-Mooney, H. & Thompson, M. (2013) A qualitative study of the safety netting behaviour of primary healthcare professionals for acutely sick young children. North American Primary Care Research Group (NAPCRG), Ottawa, November 2013.

Neill, S., Jones, C., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. & Thompson, M. (2013) Parents’ use of safety netting information in acute childhood illness: what helps, what hinders? 6th Europaediatrics held jointly with the RCPCH Annual Conference, Glasgow, 5-8th June 2013.

Jones, C., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. & Thompson, M. (2013) Safety netting behaviour of primary healthcare professionals for acutely sick young children: a qualitative study. 6th Europaediatrics held jointly with the RCPCH Annual Conference, Glasgow, 5-8th June 2013.

Jones, C., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. & Thompson, M. (2013) Safety netting behaviour of first contact clinicians for acutely sick children: a qualitative study. South West Society for Academic Primary Care Conference, Southampton, March 2013.

 

Papers

Neill, S.J., Jones, C.H. Lakhanpaul, M. Roland, D.T., Thompson, M.J. and on behalf of the ASK SNIFF research team (2014) Parent’s information seeking in acute childhood illness: what helps and what hinders decision making? Health Expectations: Online first (20 October 2014) DOI: 10.1111/hex.12289

Neill, S. J., Jones, C. H., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T. and Thompson, M. J., (2014) Parents’ help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory. Journal of Child Health Care. Online first (8 October 2014) DOI: 10.1177/1367493514551309

Jones, C., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D., Singlehurst-Mooney, H. and Thompson, M., (2013) The safety netting behaviour of first contact clinicians: a qualitative study. BMC Family Practice 14 (1), 140. DOI:10.1186/1471-2296-14-140.

Jones, C.H.D., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D., Singlehurst-Mooney, H. and Thompson, M., (2014) Information needs of parents for acute childhood illness: determining ‘what, how, where and when’ of safety netting using a qualitative exploration with parents and clinicians. BMJ Open 4 (1). DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003874

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