Our work


Acutely Sick Kid Parent Education and Training Resource (ASK PETra)

July 2015 - September 2016
Funded by Well Child

Monica Lakhanpaul (Chief Investigator)
Sarah Neill (Principal Investigator - Northampton)
Natasha Bayes (Research Assistant (Northampton))
Damian Roland (Co-Investigator)
Juliet Usher-Smith (Co-Investigator)
Laura Mullins (Parent Panel Lead)
Tracy Turner (Parent Panel Lead)

ASK SNIFF (Acutely Sick Kids Safety Netting Interventions for Families) is a national programme that aims to develop safety netting tools for parents to use to help them identify signs of serious illness in their children from birth to 5 years of age. ASK PETra (Acutely Sick Kid Parent Education and Training Resource) is the current phase of our research, which is about developing the initial prototype information resource, building on the findings from all of our previous projects.

The purpose of this project was to develop the specific content to be included within an information resource to help parents decide when to seek help for a sick child. This was a collaborative project between parents, healthcare professionals (HCPs) and clinical and academic researchers. The research team developed the written content for the six symptoms of acute childhood illness (breathing difficulty, temperature, diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration and rash), while parents and HCPs reviewed the content developed.

During the project 95 participants took part in the study; 44 parents with children under 5 years and 51 HCPs. They represented a range of social groups and professional practice backgrounds predominantly within the East Midlands. During the project study, parents and HCPs took part in online content review, as well as workshops and online surveys. The purpose of the online review process was to review the written and audio-visual content developed for the six symptoms ready to be embedded into the safety netting resource. A total of 40 parents and 46 HCPs participated in the reviewing of the content. A total of 146 review comments were received for all 6 symptoms; 50 parent comments and 96 HCP comments. Review comments involved review members agreeing or disagreeing with the content developed, or suggested alternative ways to script the content. In cases where consensus had not been achieved (e.g. a mixture of comments agreeing or disagreeing with the content), questions were generated to be asked during workshops and surveys with parents and HCPs in order to reach consensus on what content to keep, remove or amend. A total of 4 parents and 5 HCPs participated in the workshop and survey consensus process. The result of the content development, review and consensus enabled the development of the final scripted content to be embedded into the safety netting resource for the six symptoms of acute childhood illness.

Methods

A collaborative co-design mixed methods approach was used for this project to ensure that the resulting tool is accepted by, and works for, both parents and health care professionals. During the project 95 participants took part in the study; 44 parents with children under 5 years and 51 HCPs, representing a range of social groups and professional practice backgrounds predominantly within the East Midlands. During the project study, parents and HCPs took part in online content review, as well as workshops and online surveys. The purpose of the online review process was to review the written and audio-visual content developed for the six symptoms ready to be embedded into the safety netting resource. In cases where consensus had not been achieved (e.g. a mixture of comments agreeing or disagreeing with the content), questions were asked during workshops and surveys with parents and HCPs in order to reach consensus on what content to keep, remove or amend.

 

Extensive lists of ideas were generated by the focus groups/interviews. Dehydration was added as a sixth symptom, as it overlaps with other symptoms. Following this, workshops and online surveys enabled parents and HCPs to review the lists and prioritise the most essential elements to be included in the information resource. The result was a list of the essential things to include. Clinical experts reviewed this list to ensure that the information on childhood illness included was relevant, accurate and in line with national guidelines. Finally, parents reviewed and approved the final list. The result of the content development, review and consensus enabled the development of the final scripted content to be embedded into the safety netting resource for the six symptoms of acute childhood illness.

Findings

The process of content development, review and consensus enabled the development of the final scripted content to be embedded into the safety netting resource for the six symptoms of acute childhood illness. As identified during the previous phase of the research (ASK SID) parents and HCPs want information on symptoms to include three main areas:

  • Assessment of the child’s illness (predominantly),
  • Management and care of the child/illness,
  • Explanation of illness causation.

These three areas were included in the scripted content for the six symptoms.

In addition to the development of the content for the six symptoms to be embedded into the safety netting resource, a ‘content map’ was also developed in order to illustrate how the content of each symptom would flow through the overall safety netting resource.

 

Acknowledgements and thanks

The ASK SNIFF team would like to thank the following healthcare professionals for their contribution to the review process of the ASK PETra project:

Claire Arkwright

Michelle Heys

Jan Verbakel

Emily Manning

Paul Silverton

Simon Spooner

Amit Bali

Vickie Wells

Richard Scales

Jeanette Barnes

Katie Barnes

Carol Irish

Samiran Ray

Logan Manikam

Chris Harrison

Emma Brennan

Laura Tipple

Menai Salam

Rebecca Kempsey

Luke Iddon

Neil Hughes

Fleur Cantle

Tim Fooks

Christine McDermott

Cecelia Hunt

Sarah Cross

Ron Daniels

Rianne Oostenbrink

Andrew Riordan

Philippa Wood

Helen Bedford

Sally Dunmore

Sheila Miller

Pippa Hemingway

 

Dawn Warner

Rosemary Plum